A spam trap is an email address that is specifically designed to catch spammers. It is not used by real people and is often set up by email service providers to identify and block spammers

What is a spam trap and what are the two main types?
A “spam trap” (or commonly known as a “trap”) is an address that accepts mail but does not belong to a real user. There are two main types of traps: pristine and recycled. Pristine spam traps are addresses that never belonged to a real user and never signed up for any mail. Recycled spam traps are previously active addresses, which potentially belonged to a real user, but have been repurposed as a trap address after 6 or more months of inactivity and “conditioning”. These addresses have no value to you as a sender since no one is on the other end reading your email.

Spam traps are email addresses that are set up for the sole purpose of catching spammers. There are two main types of spam traps: pristine and recycled. Pristine spam traps are email addresses that have never belonged to a real user and have never signed up for any mail. Mailing to these addresses is a serious issue and indicates poor acquisition practices. Recycled spam traps are email addresses that were previously active but have been repurposed as spam traps after a period of inactivity. These addresses can end up on your list if you don’t practice good list hygiene by regularly removing inactive and invalid accounts. Mailing to spam traps has no value as no one is reading the email, and it can harm your sender reputation and deliverability. To avoid spam traps, it is important to maintain a clean email list, regularly update your databases, grow your list organically, avoid email harvesting, use double opt-in, and run an email verification tool.

Spam traps are email addresses used to catch spammers. There are two main types of spam traps: pristine and recycled.

Pristine spam traps are addresses that have never belonged to a real user and were created specifically as spam traps. Mailing to these addresses can harm your sender reputation, especially if you obtained the address without permission.

Recycled spam traps are addresses that were once used by real users but have been abandoned and repurposed as spam traps. Mailing to these addresses indicates poor list management and hygiene practices.

Spam traps are dangerous because they can land you on a blocklist, affect your email metrics, and decrease deliverability. Spam traps are managed by ISPs, anti-spam organizations, and domain blocklisting services.

To avoid spam traps, it is important to maintain good email list hygiene, regularly remove inactive and invalid addresses, grow your list organically, avoid purchasing email lists and harvesting emails from the web, use double opt-in, and run an email verification tool to identify and remove potential spam traps.

If you do end up in a spam trap, you can try segmenting inactive subscribers, sending a win-back campaign, and using an auto-resend campaign. Ultimately, it may be necessary to remove inactive subscribers from your list.

Keeping your email list clean and free from spam traps is essential for maintaining a good sender reputation and ensuring high deliverability rates.